Acme Brick - home

Red, brown, gray, white - and green all over

Although "sustainability" is a fairly new term, the basic concept has been part of Acme Brick Company since its founding.

Since 1891, we have built and operated our brick plants close to population centers. Today our network is 26 plants strong - and meets LEED's "local production" criterion of 500 miles' distance for nearly all of the central and southeastern United States

Acme people work hard to be good stewards of the environment. Our brick are made from quality earth clays and fired with clean natural gas in highly efficient, computer-controlled kilns. Two Alabama plants use methane from landfills.

We also recycle material such as scrap clay and sawdust, incorporating them into the body of our brick. These efforts keep waste out of landfills and may help boost LEED scores.

Our stewardship continues even after production ends. Through our industry-recognized reclamation programs, we have planted hundreds of thousands of trees at inactive production sites and created wetlands that offer attractive habitat for wildlife.

Sustainable and affordable

Modern brickmaking is energy efficient to begin with, but through aggressive energy management, Acme has cut the amount of gas required to fire an Acme Brick by 17.4 percent since 2003. We also fine-tune delivery routes to reduce "empty" miles traveled and cut overall fuel consumption.

Being smarter about energy is key to keeping Acme Brick affordable for homebuyers.

Mass: the M factor

Building an energy-efficient home begins with insulation and continues with a tight envelope. An Acme Brick exterior completes the equation.

The mass of a brick wall slows the transfer of heat through the wall. The resultant thermal lag means lower peak loads on air conditioning, not to mention greater interior comfort.

A long-life-cycle product that defines sustainability for decades to come

As green-building standards evolve, "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) is expected to assume a greater role. LCA is where Acme Brick show their true colors. With minimal care, they maintain their beauty and integrity for decades - a claim backed with the industry's first 100 Year Limited Guarantee for Homebuyers.

Use of landfill gas


 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency News Release - January 15, 2007

Jenkins Brick Jordan Plant Landfill Gas Energy Project

"For the first time, a major U.S. manufacturing facility has been sited and built in proximity to a landfill specifically to use the landfill gas as fuel. The new Jenkins Brick Company's manufacturing plant (the Jordan Plant) in Moody, Alabama, will use landfill gas to fuel its kilns, satisfying 40 percent of the plant's energy needs initially, with 100 percent projected in 10 years as the landfill grows."

Read more:

http://www.epa.gov/lmop/proj/prof/profile/jenkinsbrickjordanplantla.htm


 U.S. Department of Energy News Release - October 27, 2006

Alabama Manufacturer Builds Plant Next to Landfill to Use Landfill Gas as Fuel

Alabama Governor Bob Riley joined U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen Johnson October 20 at the groundbreaking of the Jenkins Brick Company new facility in Moody, Alabama. The facility is the first U.S. manufacturer to build next to a landfill in order to use landfill gas as a fuel. The new factory will be one of the largest brick-making facilities in the country, and it will obtain 40 percent of its energy from landfill gas when it opens next year. Eventually it will run entirely on landfill gas, which is considered to be a renewable energy resource, as the plant expands over the years.

Johnson said that the project will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 62,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. This is the equivalent of planting nearly 14,700 acres of forest or taking 10,000 cars off of the road. Landfill gas is composed mostly of methane, which is a much more powerful greenhouse gas then carbon dioxide. Johnson said, "What I like best about this project is that it uses a recycled source of energy. By taking landfill waste and turning it into wealth, we’re building an inexpensive, plentiful energy supply for America."

For more information about the groundbreaking, see the October 20 EPA press release.

Jenkins Brick Company is headquartered in Montgomery, Alabama, and has been using landfill gas to fuel its Montgomery brick plant since 1998. The success of this project convinced Jenkins management to build its next manufacturing facility to take advantage of local landfill gas.

The landfill owner, Jenkins Brick and Veolia Environmental Services, is a partner with the EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program to create a first of its kind landfill gas energy project. The EPA publishes a project description on its Landfill Methane Outreach Program Web site.

St. Clair County, Alabama, commissioners helped the company select Moody to locate its brick factory by declaring the 160-acre site to be an industrial park in August. The designation helps the company apply for grants from the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) as the plant expands. The county also paid a $40,015 share of a matching grant from the Community Development Block Grant Program to build a rail spur to the industrial park.

Jenkins Brick Company is investing $43 million in the project, and it is expected to employ 35 – 55 people. The pipeline from the landfill to the brick factory will cost $3 million. Because the pipe from the landfill to the Jenkins factory will cross city lines, the city expects to collect tax revenues from the project. For more information, see the Jenkins Brick Company October 20 press release below.

In a related story published in the October 27 edition of SNL Energy Renewable Energy Week, Waste Management Inc., reports that the company is now capturing landfill gas at 102 of its more than 300 landfills it operates. Electric power generators operating on landfill gas are usually rated at 3 megawatts (MW) to 10 MW capacity. Altogether, Waste Management operates 475 MW of power generation at its landfills.

The company notes that the Energy Policy Act of 2005 has increased interest in landfill gas by providing tax credits worth $0.009 per kilowatt-hour of generation. Those credits are scheduled to expire at the end of 2007.


 EPA News Release - October 20, 2006

Landfill Gas Fuels New Brick Plant

Contact Information: Roxanne Smith, (202) 564-4355 / smith.roxanne@epa.gov (media only) Victoria Ludwig, (202) 343-9291 / ludwig.victoria@epa.gov (technical questions only)

(Washington, D.C. - Oct. 20, 2006) For the first time, a major U.S. manufacturing facility has been sited and built next to a landfill specifically to use the landfill gas as fuel. The new Jenkins Brick Company's $56 million manufacturing plant in Moody, Ala., will use landfill gas to fuel its kilns, satisfying 40 percent of the plant's energy needs initially, with 100 percent projected in 10 years as the landfill grows. The project will also reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 62,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year, the equivalent of planting nearly 14,700 acres of forest.

"For centuries, bricks have been the building blocks of society, and now, by turning landfill waste into wealth, Jenkins Brick is also helping build a clean and plentiful energy supply for America," said EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson. "Through investments in renewable energy technology, President Bush and EPA are securing the power that builds our economy."

Methane is the primary component of landfill gas, which results from the natural break-down of buried waste in a landfill. Reducing methane emissions provides immediate environmental benefits because methane, a greenhouse gas, is over 20 times as potent as carbon dioxide at capturing heat in the atmosphere. Capturing and using methane as a clean fuel also provides economic and energy-security benefits.

The company's new plant is one of the largest of its kind in the nation. The facility was located and designed to reduce operating costs and greenhouse gas emissions by using clean energy from a nearby landfill. Jenkins Brick and Veolia Environmental Services, the owner of the landfill providing the gas, partnered with EPA's Landfill Methane Outreach Program to create a first of its kind landfill gas energy project. The facility is expected to benefit the local economy by creating approximately 55 new jobs.

"Our years-long cooperation with EPA's LMOP program has provided us with valuable technical expertise as we identify ways to save money -- and the environment," said Mike Jenkins IV, CEO of Jenkins Brick Company. "In building this innovative facility, our American-owned company shows that it is much more than a brick manufacturer and distributor."

Jenkins Brick Company, headquartered in Montgomery, Ala., has been using clean-burning landfill gas to fuel its Montgomery brick plant since 1998. The success of this project convinced Jenkins management to build its next manufacturing facility to take advantage of local landfill gas.

EPA's Landfill Methane Outreach Program is a voluntary assistance and partnership program that promotes the use of landfill gas as a renewable, green energy source. By preventing emissions of methane through the development of landfill gas energy projects, the program helps businesses, states, energy providers, and communities protect the environment and build a sustainable future. Over the past decade, EPA has assisted with more than 300 projects and reduced methane emissions from landfills by about 27 million metric tons of carbon equivalent.

The program also assists countries throughout the world in developing landfill methane reduction projects through the U.S.-government led Methane to Markets Partnership.

For more information on Acme Brick's sustainability story, talk to an Acme representative.

Acme Brick created this wetlands area to improve the quality of water runoff at an Arkansas brick plant.

No matter which color of Acme Brick you choose for your next home, you can be sure that it reflects not only your personal style but also classic green values.



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